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We are Causa Justa :: Just Cause (CJJC), a multi-racial, grassroots organization building community leadership to achieve justice for low-income San Francisco and Oakland residents.
Updated: 1 min 15 sec ago

Tenants Rights Tuesdays

Mon, 10/06/2014 - 11:58am

This past Tuesday the Community and Economic Development Committee heard testimony from courageous tenants, Just Cause leaders, and allies who all spoke out in support of the Tenant Protection Ordinance (TPO) in Oakland.  Along with all the supporters were a lot of landlords and 2 major landlord groups – the East Bay Rental Housing Association and the Jobs and Housing Coalition, who came out in opposition to the TPO. The council delayed the debate on the TPO and are continuing it to Tuesday, October 14th for the debate and vote.  

This Tuesday, is a major CALL-IN day to tell the City Council loud and clear that we need them to pass the TPO and not to water it down.

Please pick up the phone call the following councilmembers (in this order if you dont have much time) :

Rebecca Kaplan (At-large rep)  (510) 238-7008    atlarge@oaklandnet.com   

Libby Schaaf (District 4)   (510) 238-7004  lschaaf@oaklandnet.com   

Noel Gallo (District 5)  (510) 238-7005  ngallo@oaklandnet.com    

Desley Brooks (District 6) (510) 238-7006   dbrooks@oaklandnet.com  

Lynette McElhaney (District 3) (510) 238-7003 lmcelhaney@oaklandnet.com   

Pat Kernighan (District 2)  ( 510) 238-7002  pkernighan@oaklandnet.com     

Dan Kalb (Champion - District 1)   (510) 238-7001  dkalb@oaklandnet.com 

Larry Reid (ANTI - District 7)  (510) 238-7007    lreid@oaklandnet.com    

 

When you call, give them this simple message:

Councilmember, I am calling to urge you to pass the Tenant Protection Ordinance to protect Oakland's renters and families from displacement. 

We want the TPO to:

·      Apply to as many units as possible!  Don't leave anyone out of these protections

·      Have civil penalties! This will be what deters bad landlords from using intimidation to push out their tenants

·      TO BE PASSED NOW! Do not let the elections or any other reason delay a protection that is needed today.

That's it. You can add whatever you want. Tell them your story. Tell them why it is particularly important to you. But whatever you do, call today - It's Tenants Rights Tuesday!

 

NEXT TENANTS RIGHTS TUESDAY: October 14th

We will meet at the City Hall for the CED Committee's debate on the Tenant Proection Ordinance

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 1:30pm to get seats and pack the chambers.

-       Will you speak in support of the TPO?

 if you spoke at the last hearing, you will not be able to speak again because the item is continued, BUT if you signed up and didn’t speak last time, you can still speak.

Tenants Rights Tuesday is at the Full Council! Tuesday, October 21st

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 5pm for a rally to get ready for the full council meeting, can YOU be there?

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Tenants Rights Tuesdays

Mon, 10/06/2014 - 11:58am

This past Tuesday the Community and Economic Development Committee heard testimony from courageous tenants, Just Cause leaders, and allies who all spoke out in support of the Tenant Protection Ordinance (TPO) in Oakland.  Along with all the supporters were a lot of landlords and 2 major landlord groups – the East Bay Rental Housing Association and the Jobs and Housing Coalition, who came out in opposition to the TPO. The council delayed the debate on the TPO and are continuing it to Tuesday, October 14th for the debate and vote.  

This Tuesday, is a major CALL-IN day to tell the City Council loud and clear that we need them to pass the TPO and not to water it down.

Please pick up the phone call the following councilmembers (in this order if you dont have much time) :

Rebecca Kaplan (At-large rep)  (510) 238-7008    atlarge@oaklandnet.com   

Libby Schaaf (District 4)   (510) 238-7004  lschaaf@oaklandnet.com   

Noel Gallo (District 5)  (510) 238-7005  ngallo@oaklandnet.com    

Desley Brooks (District 6) (510) 238-7006   dbrooks@oaklandnet.com  

Lynette McElhaney (District 3) (510) 238-7003 lmcelhaney@oaklandnet.com   

Pat Kernighan (District 2)  ( 510) 238-7002  pkernighan@oaklandnet.com     

Dan Kalb (Champion - District 1)   (510) 238-7001  dkalb@oaklandnet.com 

Larry Reid (ANTI - District 7)  (510) 238-7007    lreid@oaklandnet.com    

 

When you call, give them this simple message:

Councilmember, I am calling to urge you to pass the Tenant Protection Ordinance to protect Oakland's renters and families from displacement. 

We want the TPO to:

·      Apply to as many units as possible!  Don't leave anyone out of these protections

·      Have civil penalties! This will be what deters bad landlords from using intimidation to push out their tenants

·      TO BE PASSED NOW! Do not let the elections or any other reason delay a protection that is needed today.

That's it. You can add whatever you want. Tell them your story. Tell them why it is particularly important to you. But whatever you do, call today - It's Tenants Rights Tuesday!

 

NEXT TENANTS RIGHTS TUESDAY: October 14th

We will meet at the City Hall for the CED Committee's debate on the Tenant Proection Ordinance

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 1:30pm to get seats and pack the chambers.

-       Will you speak in support of the TPO?

 if you spoke at the last hearing, you will not be able to speak again because the item is continued, BUT if you signed up and didn’t speak last time, you can still speak.

Tenants Rights Tuesday is at the Full Council! Tuesday, October 21st

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 5pm for a rally to get ready for the full council meeting, can YOU be there?

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Tenants Rights Tuesdays

Mon, 10/06/2014 - 11:58am

This past Tuesday the Community and Economic Development Committee heard testimony from courageous tenants, Just Cause leaders, and allies who all spoke out in support of the Tenant Protection Ordinance (TPO) in Oakland.  Along with all the supporters were a lot of landlords and 2 major landlord groups – the East Bay Rental Housing Association and the Jobs and Housing Coalition, who came out in opposition to the TPO. The council delayed the debate on the TPO and are continuing it to Tuesday, October 14th for the debate and vote.  

This Tuesday, is a major CALL-IN day to tell the City Council loud and clear that we need them to pass the TPO and not to water it down.

Please pick up the phone call the following councilmembers (in this order if you dont have much time) :

Rebecca Kaplan (At-large rep)  (510) 238-7008    atlarge@oaklandnet.com   

Libby Schaaf (District 4)   (510) 238-7004  lschaaf@oaklandnet.com   

Noel Gallo (District 5)  (510) 238-7005  ngallo@oaklandnet.com    

Desley Brooks (District 6) (510) 238-7006   dbrooks@oaklandnet.com  

Lynette McElhaney (District 3) (510) 238-7003 lmcelhaney@oaklandnet.com   

Pat Kernighan (District 2)  ( 510) 238-7002  pkernighan@oaklandnet.com     

Dan Kalb (Champion - District 1)   (510) 238-7001  dkalb@oaklandnet.com 

Larry Reid (ANTI - District 7)  (510) 238-7007    lreid@oaklandnet.com    

 

When you call, give them this simple message:

Councilmember, I am calling to urge you to pass the Tenant Protection Ordinance to protect Oakland's renters and families from displacement. 

We want the TPO to:

·      Apply to as many units as possible!  Don't leave anyone out of these protections

·      Have civil penalties! This will be what deters bad landlords from using intimidation to push out their tenants

·      TO BE PASSED NOW! Do not let the elections or any other reason delay a protection that is needed today.

That's it. You can add whatever you want. Tell them your story. Tell them why it is particularly important to you. But whatever you do, call today - It's Tenants Rights Tuesday!

 

NEXT TENANTS RIGHTS TUESDAY: October 14th

We will meet at the City Hall for the CED Committee's debate on the Tenant Proection Ordinance

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 1:30pm to get seats and pack the chambers.

-       Will you speak in support of the TPO?

 if you spoke at the last hearing, you will not be able to speak again because the item is continued, BUT if you signed up and didn’t speak last time, you can still speak.

Tenants Rights Tuesday is at the Full Council! Tuesday, October 21st

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 5pm for a rally to get ready for the full council meeting, can YOU be there?

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Tenants Rights Tuesdays

Mon, 10/06/2014 - 11:58am

This past Tuesday the Community and Economic Development Committee heard testimony from courageous tenants, Just Cause leaders, and allies who all spoke out in support of the Tenant Protection Ordinance (TPO) in Oakland.  Along with all the supporters were a lot of landlords and 2 major landlord groups – the East Bay Rental Housing Association and the Jobs and Housing Coalition, who came out in opposition to the TPO. The council delayed the debate on the TPO and are continuing it to Tuesday, October 14th for the debate and vote.  

This Tuesday, is a major CALL-IN day to tell the City Council loud and clear that we need them to pass the TPO and not to water it down.

Please pick up the phone call the following councilmembers (in this order if you dont have much time) :

Rebecca Kaplan (At-large rep)  (510) 238-7008    atlarge@oaklandnet.com   

Libby Schaaf (District 4)   (510) 238-7004  lschaaf@oaklandnet.com   

Noel Gallo (District 5)  (510) 238-7005  ngallo@oaklandnet.com    

Desley Brooks (District 6) (510) 238-7006   dbrooks@oaklandnet.com  

Lynette McElhaney (District 3) (510) 238-7003 lmcelhaney@oaklandnet.com   

Pat Kernighan (District 2)  ( 510) 238-7002  pkernighan@oaklandnet.com     

Dan Kalb (Champion - District 1)   (510) 238-7001  dkalb@oaklandnet.com 

Larry Reid (ANTI - District 7)  (510) 238-7007    lreid@oaklandnet.com    

 

When you call, give them this simple message:

Councilmember, I am calling to urge you to pass the Tenant Protection Ordinance to protect Oakland's renters and families from displacement. 

We want the TPO to:

·      Apply to as many units as possible!  Don't leave anyone out of these protections

·      Have civil penalties! This will be what deters bad landlords from using intimidation to push out their tenants

·      TO BE PASSED NOW! Do not let the elections or any other reason delay a protection that is needed today.

That's it. You can add whatever you want. Tell them your story. Tell them why it is particularly important to you. But whatever you do, call today - It's Tenants Rights Tuesday!

 

NEXT TENANTS RIGHTS TUESDAY: October 14th

We will meet at the City Hall for the CED Committee's debate on the Tenant Proection Ordinance

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 1:30pm to get seats and pack the chambers.

-       Will you speak in support of the TPO?

 if you spoke at the last hearing, you will not be able to speak again because the item is continued, BUT if you signed up and didn’t speak last time, you can still speak.

Tenants Rights Tuesday is at the Full Council! Tuesday, October 21st

-       We are meeting at City Hall at 5pm for a rally to get ready for the full council meeting, can YOU be there?

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Unity is POWER/¡Unidad es POWER!

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 7:38pm


 

 On a day when millions of workers across the world will take to the streets marching in unity and solidarity, we are proud to announce that after more than a decade of partnership, camaraderie, and mutual development, POWER and Causa Justa :: Just Cause will officially be joining forces!


Together POWER and CJJC bring decades of experience fighting displacement from the bottom up, and prioritizing organizing and leadership development in working class Black and Latino communities.   Our aim is to consolidate movement forces, to grow the scale and impact of our  organizing, and in particular to expand the scope and strength of Black organizing and Black-Brown unity in the SF Bay Area as a strategic contribution to movement building in the United States.

We are facing a crisis of Black displacement from San Francisco to Oakland to Antioch. This is a regional struggle requiring regional strategy and response.  Along with a number of our allies across the region, we are committed to growing a new era of Black organizing in the Bay Area to address this crisis from the bottom up, while building solidarity with Latino immigrant and other working class communities who are impacted by global and local displacement.

We will complete the official merger by January 2015, integrating core components of POWER’s work into CJJC’s structure, and keeping the name Causa Justa :: Just Cause. We believe that this bold change will allow us to better serve our communities, reduce administrative work, and amplify our collective political power as one united organization.

Like millions of our counterparts around the world, on May 1st we are proud to declare with this bold action, and through the bullhorn, “Unity is POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

In Solidarity,
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold, and Vanessa Moses


Ps. Join us in the streets together TODAY, Thursday, May 1
3pm
Fruitvale BART Station
Rally & March

#unityisPOWER #MayDay2014

Espanol

¡Unidad es POWER! Únete a nosotros 1ro. de Mayo


En un día en el que millones de trabajadores marcharán en las calles de todo el mundo por la unidad y la solidaridad, anunciamos con orgullo que tras más de una década de asociación, camaradería y evolución mutua, ¡la organización POWER y Causa Justa :: Just Cause (CJJC) uniran sus fuerzas!

Juntas, POWER y CJJC unen décadas de experiencia en la lucha contra el desplazamiento, desde las bases hacia arriba, con la prioridad de organizar políticamente y fomentar el liderazgo en las comunidades negras y latinas de clase trabajadora. Nuestra meta es unir las dinámicas del movimiento, hacer nuestra organización política más grande e impactante, y ampliar el alcance y la fuerza de la organización de los mestizos y negros en Área de la Bahía de San Francisco como contribución estratégica a la construcción de un movimiento nacional en los EEUU.

Estamos enfrentándonos a una crisis de desplazamiento de personas negras en San Francisco, Oakland, e incluso ciudades como Antioch. Es una lucha regional que requiere de estrategias y respuestas regionales. Junto a varios grupos aliados de la región, nos comprometemos a hacer crecer una nueva de era de organización política negra en el Área de la Bahía, para así enfrentar la crisis desde abajo hacia arriba, al tiempo que construimos solidaridad con inmigrantes latinos y otras comunidades de clase trabajadora que están siendo impactadas por el desplazamiento local y global.

La fusión de ambas organizaciones se completará de manera oficial el próximo mes de enero de 2015, cuando los componentes centrales de POWER se integrarán a la estructura de CJJC. Se mantendrá el nombre Causa Justa :: Just Cause. Creemos que este importante cambio an nos permitirá brindar mejor servicio a nuestras comunidades, reducir las labores administrativas y ampliar nuestro poder político colectivo, como una sola organizacion unida.

Así como millones de otras personas en todo el mundo, en el día 1º de mayo nos sentimos orgullosos de anunciar esta audaz acción, alzando la voz por el megáfono decimos “¡Unidad es POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

¿Quiere mostrar su solidaridad y nos quiere apoyar para esta fusión? ¿Puede donar $25, $50 o $1.000 para así poder avanzar en el camino para la consecución de comunidades de color saludables, estables y poderosas?

En solidaridad
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold y Vanessa Moses

P.S. ¡Únans a nosotros en las calles HOY!
3p de la tarde
Estación de BART en Fruitvale
Concentración y marcha
#UnidadesPODER #MayDay2014

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Unity is POWER/¡Unidad es POWER!

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 7:38pm


 

 On a day when millions of workers across the world will take to the streets marching in unity and solidarity, we are proud to announce that after more than a decade of partnership, camaraderie, and mutual development, POWER and Causa Justa :: Just Cause will officially be joining forces!


Together POWER and CJJC bring decades of experience fighting displacement from the bottom up, and prioritizing organizing and leadership development in working class Black and Latino communities.   Our aim is to consolidate movement forces, to grow the scale and impact of our  organizing, and in particular to expand the scope and strength of Black organizing and Black-Brown unity in the SF Bay Area as a strategic contribution to movement building in the United States.

We are facing a crisis of Black displacement from San Francisco to Oakland to Antioch. This is a regional struggle requiring regional strategy and response.  Along with a number of our allies across the region, we are committed to growing a new era of Black organizing in the Bay Area to address this crisis from the bottom up, while building solidarity with Latino immigrant and other working class communities who are impacted by global and local displacement.

We will complete the official merger by January 2015, integrating core components of POWER’s work into CJJC’s structure, and keeping the name Causa Justa :: Just Cause. We believe that this bold change will allow us to better serve our communities, reduce administrative work, and amplify our collective political power as one united organization.

Like millions of our counterparts around the world, on May 1st we are proud to declare with this bold action, and through the bullhorn, “Unity is POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

In Solidarity,
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold, and Vanessa Moses


Ps. Join us in the streets together TODAY, Thursday, May 1
3pm
Fruitvale BART Station
Rally & March

#unityisPOWER #MayDay2014

Espanol

¡Unidad es POWER! Únete a nosotros 1ro. de Mayo


En un día en el que millones de trabajadores marcharán en las calles de todo el mundo por la unidad y la solidaridad, anunciamos con orgullo que tras más de una década de asociación, camaradería y evolución mutua, ¡la organización POWER y Causa Justa :: Just Cause (CJJC) uniran sus fuerzas!

Juntas, POWER y CJJC unen décadas de experiencia en la lucha contra el desplazamiento, desde las bases hacia arriba, con la prioridad de organizar políticamente y fomentar el liderazgo en las comunidades negras y latinas de clase trabajadora. Nuestra meta es unir las dinámicas del movimiento, hacer nuestra organización política más grande e impactante, y ampliar el alcance y la fuerza de la organización de los mestizos y negros en Área de la Bahía de San Francisco como contribución estratégica a la construcción de un movimiento nacional en los EEUU.

Estamos enfrentándonos a una crisis de desplazamiento de personas negras en San Francisco, Oakland, e incluso ciudades como Antioch. Es una lucha regional que requiere de estrategias y respuestas regionales. Junto a varios grupos aliados de la región, nos comprometemos a hacer crecer una nueva de era de organización política negra en el Área de la Bahía, para así enfrentar la crisis desde abajo hacia arriba, al tiempo que construimos solidaridad con inmigrantes latinos y otras comunidades de clase trabajadora que están siendo impactadas por el desplazamiento local y global.

La fusión de ambas organizaciones se completará de manera oficial el próximo mes de enero de 2015, cuando los componentes centrales de POWER se integrarán a la estructura de CJJC. Se mantendrá el nombre Causa Justa :: Just Cause. Creemos que este importante cambio an nos permitirá brindar mejor servicio a nuestras comunidades, reducir las labores administrativas y ampliar nuestro poder político colectivo, como una sola organizacion unida.

Así como millones de otras personas en todo el mundo, en el día 1º de mayo nos sentimos orgullosos de anunciar esta audaz acción, alzando la voz por el megáfono decimos “¡Unidad es POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

¿Quiere mostrar su solidaridad y nos quiere apoyar para esta fusión? ¿Puede donar $25, $50 o $1.000 para así poder avanzar en el camino para la consecución de comunidades de color saludables, estables y poderosas?

En solidaridad
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold y Vanessa Moses

P.S. ¡Únans a nosotros en las calles HOY!
3p de la tarde
Estación de BART en Fruitvale
Concentración y marcha
#UnidadesPODER #MayDay2014

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Unity is POWER/¡Unidad es POWER!

Wed, 04/30/2014 - 7:38pm


 

 On a day when millions of workers across the world will take to the streets marching in unity and solidarity, we are proud to announce that after more than a decade of partnership, camaraderie, and mutual development, POWER and Causa Justa :: Just Cause will officially be joining forces!


Together POWER and CJJC bring decades of experience fighting displacement from the bottom up, and prioritizing organizing and leadership development in working class Black and Latino communities.   Our aim is to consolidate movement forces, to grow the scale and impact of our  organizing, and in particular to expand the scope and strength of Black organizing and Black-Brown unity in the SF Bay Area as a strategic contribution to movement building in the United States.

We are facing a crisis of Black displacement from San Francisco to Oakland to Antioch. This is a regional struggle requiring regional strategy and response.  Along with a number of our allies across the region, we are committed to growing a new era of Black organizing in the Bay Area to address this crisis from the bottom up, while building solidarity with Latino immigrant and other working class communities who are impacted by global and local displacement.

We will complete the official merger by January 2015, integrating core components of POWER’s work into CJJC’s structure, and keeping the name Causa Justa :: Just Cause. We believe that this bold change will allow us to better serve our communities, reduce administrative work, and amplify our collective political power as one united organization.

Like millions of our counterparts around the world, on May 1st we are proud to declare with this bold action, and through the bullhorn, “Unity is POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

In Solidarity,
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold, and Vanessa Moses


Ps. Join us in the streets together TODAY, Thursday, May 1
3pm
Fruitvale BART Station
Rally & March

#unityisPOWER #MayDay2014

Espanol

¡Unidad es POWER! Únete a nosotros 1ro. de Mayo


En un día en el que millones de trabajadores marcharán en las calles de todo el mundo por la unidad y la solidaridad, anunciamos con orgullo que tras más de una década de asociación, camaradería y evolución mutua, ¡la organización POWER y Causa Justa :: Just Cause (CJJC) uniran sus fuerzas!

Juntas, POWER y CJJC unen décadas de experiencia en la lucha contra el desplazamiento, desde las bases hacia arriba, con la prioridad de organizar políticamente y fomentar el liderazgo en las comunidades negras y latinas de clase trabajadora. Nuestra meta es unir las dinámicas del movimiento, hacer nuestra organización política más grande e impactante, y ampliar el alcance y la fuerza de la organización de los mestizos y negros en Área de la Bahía de San Francisco como contribución estratégica a la construcción de un movimiento nacional en los EEUU.

Estamos enfrentándonos a una crisis de desplazamiento de personas negras en San Francisco, Oakland, e incluso ciudades como Antioch. Es una lucha regional que requiere de estrategias y respuestas regionales. Junto a varios grupos aliados de la región, nos comprometemos a hacer crecer una nueva de era de organización política negra en el Área de la Bahía, para así enfrentar la crisis desde abajo hacia arriba, al tiempo que construimos solidaridad con inmigrantes latinos y otras comunidades de clase trabajadora que están siendo impactadas por el desplazamiento local y global.

La fusión de ambas organizaciones se completará de manera oficial el próximo mes de enero de 2015, cuando los componentes centrales de POWER se integrarán a la estructura de CJJC. Se mantendrá el nombre Causa Justa :: Just Cause. Creemos que este importante cambio an nos permitirá brindar mejor servicio a nuestras comunidades, reducir las labores administrativas y ampliar nuestro poder político colectivo, como una sola organizacion unida.

Así como millones de otras personas en todo el mundo, en el día 1º de mayo nos sentimos orgullosos de anunciar esta audaz acción, alzando la voz por el megáfono decimos “¡Unidad es POWER!”

Will you stand with us and show your support for this merger? Can you donate $25, $50, $1,000 to push us forward on the road to healthy, stable, powerful communities of color?

¿Quiere mostrar su solidaridad y nos quiere apoyar para esta fusión? ¿Puede donar $25, $50 o $1.000 para así poder avanzar en el camino para la consecución de comunidades de color saludables, estables y poderosas?

En solidaridad
Jaron Browne, NTanya Lee, Aspen Dominguez,
Maria Poblet, Dawn Phillips, Adam Gold y Vanessa Moses

P.S. ¡Únans a nosotros en las calles HOY!
3p de la tarde
Estación de BART en Fruitvale
Concentración y marcha
#UnidadesPODER #MayDay2014

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Gentrification and The Battle for the Heart of San Francisco | Maria Poblet

Tue, 02/04/2014 - 2:55pm

San Francisco’s gentrification has reached a ridiculous new extreme, making it the most expensive city in the country,[i] outstripping even Manhattan, the home of Wall Street and its corporate tycoons.

The affordability crisis is so extreme that many of those who rode into the Mission District on the first wave of gentrification, during the dotcom boom in the 90s, are now crying foul. Even they can’t afford the 2-bedroom apartment on Valencia Street renting for $11,500/month.[ii] They find themselves priced out of their lofts and community networks, by a whole new wave of highly paid tech workers who ride in on the Google bus every evening, driving rents and home prices to dizzying new heights.

If a well-paid tech worker can’t stay in the Mission, what are the prospects for someone like Jessica, a student whose mother works as a janitor? Born living at 24th and Harrison, she came to Causa Justa :: Just Cause to find our what her family could do to keep their home. They battled valiantly, but were ultimately pushed out of their home of 23 years by an investor who forced them to accept a buy out, by threatening to Ellis Act the entire 9-unit building.

The Ellis Act, passed by the real estate lobby in 1986 allows landlords to remove rent-controlled units from the rental market, and turn them into condominiums for sale. It’s a real estate speculator’s dream, and a long-term tenant’s nightmare. Particularly in gentrifying neighborhoods, where real estate prices spike and there’s a profit motive to kick out long-term tenants.[iii]

Jessica’s working class Latino family is deeply committed to staying in San Francisco. The city is more than just their home. It’s home to their extended family of aunties, godfathers, cousins and in-laws. It’s where they have worked in service-sector jobs since the 80s, when so many Central American immigrants arrived to the Sanctuary City[iv], infusing local politics with internationalist ethics. It’s the web of community networks, public schools, and neighorhood-based social services that supports kids as they grow up, and adults as they become elders. It’s that way-beyond-nuclear type of family we call “community.”

Community is that palpable sense of connectedness you feel at the Palestinian-owned corner store on Mission Street. At the Spanish-only Thai grocer on 16th street, where decades-long neighbors run into each, buying freshly fried plantain chips made by a Honduran neighbor, hard-to-find Vietnamese hot sauce, or prickly delicious Rambutan fruit, while catchy Arab pop and Northern Mexican Rancheras blare onto the street. Community is the lunch counter that has served southern Barbeque to SRO residents ever since the days that same building was a tenement, housing African-American migrants who came here from the South to build the naval shipyard in Hunter’s Point.

Their descendants are now scattered as far as Antioch and Sacramento, over-represented in homeless shelters, absent from the streets of the Fillmore, SF’s former center of Black culture, now decorated with painfully ironic “Jazz Legacy” street signs for tourists.[v] Community is the traditional Mexican Tres Leches cake the inter-racial queer couple buys at the Chinese bakery every year, wishing a transgender partner “Happy Birthday” to celebrate their gender transition.

Community is the social fabric made up of each of these inter-twined threads. It’s not something you can put a price on. But there is a price - a huge price.

In order to stay in San Francisco, Jessica’s family now pays 40% more for their housing. Did janitors' wages go up 40% this year? Did the cost of living decrease 40%? Did mom-and-pop stores that serve families like Jessica’s get a 40% decrease in skyrocketing commercial rents, so they could lower prices? Not a chance. Instead, Jessica’s family makes it work the way thousands do, by living in more crowded, less habitable conditions, cutting costs on everything from healthcare, to transportation, to food.

For the thousands of families like Jessica’s, the battle to expand tenant rights is more important than ever. Yes, building affordable housing is important. But, by itself, it is just not enough. Non-profit developers struggle to make ends meet and keep units off the market, and, ironically, they need to raise money from the very same corporate interests that are razing our communities. Inclusionary zoning – a few affordable units within huge market-rate developments – is at best a drop in the bucket, and, most often a window-dressing used to justify huge luxury developments that accelerate the pace of gentrification. While all of these reforms have a place in a larger strategy, tenant rights are crucial today more than ever. The single most aggressive way to increase affordability and defend thousands of working class families in San Francisco is to regulate the rental market.

Last year, Causa Justa :: Just Cause lead an effort to win a “hassle-free” housing law -penalizing landlords who harass, making it harder for them to push working class people out & double the rents in gentrifying San Francisco. We also won a subjective battle. We proved to ourselves, to elected officials, and to our communities who are under attack that displacement is not inevitable, that regulations in market housing can curb displacement, and that impacted communities can lead the fight to build a different kind of San Francisco – one that holds community at its heart.

Who are we up against?

Is it tech corporations, real estate developers, local government? Recent protests against the Google Bus highlighted this question, and made national headlines. Some blame tech workers - highly paid, primarily young white people who are pouring into long-time working class communities of color; workers who too often treat our communities like a colorful “ethnic” backdrop for their corporate lives. Some blame the real estate industry - the most active wing of the finance sector that has a stranglehold on California’s economy. The ruthless industry is famous for creating the foreclosure crisis, embodied now by “flippers” that circle like vultures around Mission District Victorians after a working class family has been evicted, setting up sandwich board signs that signal the conversion of a rent-controlled unit into a million-dollar condominium.

This question came up at a meeting I recently attended, where Mission-district community-based organizations met with tech sector representatives, convened by District 9 Supervisor, David Campos. Google, Facebook, AirBnB, and a host of smaller crowd-source start-ups approached Supervisor Campos, wanting to fix the image problem tech has earned for itself in the Mission District. Rather than letting the big companies make a token gesture for PR purposes, to his credit, he brought mission community organizations together so we could express our concerns directly.

It was enlightening, to say the least, to speak directly to representatives of these companies. I noticed that smaller start-ups tended to have a very different character than the big corporations. And yet, somehow, in the public eye, huge tech corporations retain a kind of “perpetual start-up” image – as if its passion, creativity, genius, that drives them, not the billions of dollars they make in profit. A little research revealed that the giant tech corporations are, in fact, known for cartel-like behavior. A huge lawsuit is currently pending, seeking compensation for tens of thousands of engineers whose wages were kept artificially low. CEO’s from Google, Apple, Intel, and Adobe are being sued for violating the Anti-Trust Act, conspiring with each other so that none of them would recruit engineers at each other’s companies with higher wages, thus repressing engineer wages throughout the industry in order to increase profits.[vi] Not to mention wi-fi buses that shuttle workers from SF to Silicon Valley squeeze at least two more hours of work out of each employee. It was ironic, then, to hear company reps defend tech employees from community criticism. If you wanted your employees to be treated more respectfully, shouldn’t you start by doing so, yourself?

What these tech corporation representatives (many in new “community liaison” positions just created a few months ago in response to public pressure) heard from the community was how tech workers flooding into the Mission creates the profit motive for landlords to push people out. Whether the individual tech workers are conscious of it or not, they are complicit in the process of gentrification. The Google bus protests struck a nerve because they highlighted how the Tech sector is facilitating the forced displacement of families like Jessica’s, all while using city infrastructure built with taxes her family has paid, for decades, while tech companies have dodged taxation. The recent ruling by the Metropolitan Transport Agency requiring these huge corporate buses pay $1 per stop was like a slap in the face to the community. Jessica herself pays $2 each time she rides Muni or gets on the bus – each individual bus rider pays DOUBLE what these tax-dodging multi-billion corporations pay. [vii]

Both the Tech and the Real Estate Industries have to take responsibility for the affordability crisis in San Francisco. Blaming Real Estate is an easy out for Tech companies that claim to be “innovating for social good” but ignore the impact their boardrooms of innovation have on surrounding communities. Meanwhile, Real Estate happily lets Tech workers take the blame for their reckless profiteering, hiding behind the myth that the housing market is some kind of force of nature, instead of a real time series of power relationships that human beings have responsibility for. In the background of each wave of gentrification, each massive increase in rents, each conversion of a rent-controlled apartment into a luxury condominium is an incredibly powerful finance industry that shapes not just San Francisco, but California as a whole.

Who will defend the heart of San Francisco?

Local governments need to step up to the challenge of holding corporations accountable. Accepting gifts from Tech Industry tycoons as a way to let them avoid real taxation is neither sustainable as a strategy, nor defensible morally. Letting Real Estate throw in a couple affordable units as a way to avoid real regulation in the housing market is not just insufficient to meet the affordability needs – it’s fueling the displacement of working class communities of color.

In his “State of the City” address, Mayor Ed Lee promised to defend tenant protections, fight the Ellis Act, and build affordable housing. Without a strategy of corporate accountability, these promises will be impossible to keep. What does the city gain by depriving itself of tax revenue? Billions of dollars come through San Francisco this way, pushing working class communities out and filtering into private hands. Promising to provide “Housing for All” without an aggressive corporate accountability strategy is like handing out free umbrellas in the face of a Tsunami.

And it's bigger than just the Mayor. Every one of us has a role to play in the battle for the heart of San Francisco. Concerned individuals, direct action collectives, neighborhood associations, small businesses committed to the community, tech workers exploited by their bosses, we all have a responsibility. Causa Justa :: Just Cause organizes people like Jessica, people directly impacted by the crisis, who instead of being victims are, through community struggle, becoming protagonists in the fight for the heart of San Francisco. We know that supporting grassroots leadership is the only way we will change the balance of power in the long term, and we built an organization to play that role in the movement. And there are many more roles to play – from legal and policy work, to direct action in the streets, to building affordable housing, to cultural and community healing work. If we work together, we are stronger. As we learned in the late 90s in the mission, we must work together at a scale bigger than any one neighborhood if we are to contend with the powerful forces driving gentrification.

Today, we have citywide organizations like San Francisco Rising and the San Francisco Anti-Displacement Coalition, poised to fight the battle for the heart of San Francisco. If local government isn't representing us well, then we can make ourselves heard – at the ballot box, in the streets, at corporate headquarters and bus stops, in church halls and city hall.

Gentrification is not natural. Displacement is not inevitable. Everyday people, when we come together, can change the course of history.

Join Jessica, and hundreds of impacted tenants as we come together to build grassroots power, Sat, Feb 8th, at the citywide San Francisco tenant convention!

Live elsewhere in California? Sign the petition to repeal the Ellis Act.

 

[i] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/14/san-francisco-rents-the-highest-in-nation_n_1345275.html http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/san-francisco-rent_n_2592561.html

[ii] http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3500-19th-St-302-San-Francisco-CA-94110/2108983740_zpid/?utm_source=email&;utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp

[iii] http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/11/07/117540/Priced-Out-Ellis-Act-San-Francisco-eviction

[iv] http://sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=1067

[v]More: http://gawker.com/dear-khary-an-autobiography-of-gentrification-1227561902

[vi] http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-google-anti-trust-2013-10

[vii]More: http://www.salon.com/2014/01/23/when_companies_break_the_law_and_people_pay_the_scary_lesson_of_the_google_bus/

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Gentrification and The Battle for the Heart of San Francisco | Maria Poblet

Tue, 02/04/2014 - 2:55pm

San Francisco’s gentrification has reached a ridiculous new extreme, making it the most expensive city in the country,[i] outstripping even Manhattan, the home of Wall Street and its corporate tycoons.

The affordability crisis is so extreme that many of those who rode into the Mission District on the first wave of gentrification, during the dotcom boom in the 90s, are now crying foul. Even they can’t afford the 2-bedroom apartment on Valencia Street renting for $11,500/month.[ii] They find themselves priced out of their lofts and community networks, by a whole new wave of highly paid tech workers who ride in on the Google bus every evening, driving rents and home prices to dizzying new heights.

If a well-paid tech worker can’t stay in the Mission, what are the prospects for someone like Jessica, a student whose mother works as a janitor? Born living at 24th and Harrison, she came to Causa Justa :: Just Cause to find our what her family could do to keep their home. They battled valiantly, but were ultimately pushed out of their home of 23 years by an investor who forced them to accept a buy out, by threatening to Ellis Act the entire 9-unit building.

The Ellis Act, passed by the real estate lobby in 1986 allows landlords to remove rent-controlled units from the rental market, and turn them into condominiums for sale. It’s a real estate speculator’s dream, and a long-term tenant’s nightmare. Particularly in gentrifying neighborhoods, where real estate prices spike and there’s a profit motive to kick out long-term tenants.[iii]

Jessica’s working class Latino family is deeply committed to staying in San Francisco. The city is more than just their home. It’s home to their extended family of aunties, godfathers, cousins and in-laws. It’s where they have worked in service-sector jobs since the 80s, when so many Central American immigrants arrived to the Sanctuary City[iv], infusing local politics with internationalist ethics. It’s the web of community networks, public schools, and neighorhood-based social services that supports kids as they grow up, and adults as they become elders. It’s that way-beyond-nuclear type of family we call “community.”

Community is that palpable sense of connectedness you feel at the Palestinian-owned corner store on Mission Street. At the Spanish-only Thai grocer on 16th street, where decades-long neighbors run into each, buying freshly fried plantain chips made by a Honduran neighbor, hard-to-find Vietnamese hot sauce, or prickly delicious Rambutan fruit, while catchy Arab pop and Northern Mexican Rancheras blare onto the street. Community is the lunch counter that has served southern Barbeque to SRO residents ever since the days that same building was a tenement, housing African-American migrants who came here from the South to build the naval shipyard in Hunter’s Point.

Their descendants are now scattered as far as Antioch and Sacramento, over-represented in homeless shelters, absent from the streets of the Fillmore, SF’s former center of Black culture, now decorated with painfully ironic “Jazz Legacy” street signs for tourists.[v] Community is the traditional Mexican Tres Leches cake the inter-racial queer couple buys at the Chinese bakery every year, wishing a transgender partner “Happy Birthday” to celebrate their gender transition.

Community is the social fabric made up of each of these inter-twined threads. It’s not something you can put a price on. But there is a price - a huge price.

In order to stay in San Francisco, Jessica’s family now pays 40% more for their housing. Did janitors' wages go up 40% this year? Did the cost of living decrease 40%? Did mom-and-pop stores that serve families like Jessica’s get a 40% decrease in skyrocketing commercial rents, so they could lower prices? Not a chance. Instead, Jessica’s family makes it work the way thousands do, by living in more crowded, less habitable conditions, cutting costs on everything from healthcare, to transportation, to food.

For the thousands of families like Jessica’s, the battle to expand tenant rights is more important than ever. Yes, building affordable housing is important. But, by itself, it is just not enough. Non-profit developers struggle to make ends meet and keep units off the market, and, ironically, they need to raise money from the very same corporate interests that are razing our communities. Inclusionary zoning – a few affordable units within huge market-rate developments – is at best a drop in the bucket, and, most often a window-dressing used to justify huge luxury developments that accelerate the pace of gentrification. While all of these reforms have a place in a larger strategy, tenant rights are crucial today more than ever. The single most aggressive way to increase affordability and defend thousands of working class families in San Francisco is to regulate the rental market.

Last year, Causa Justa :: Just Cause lead an effort to win a “hassle-free” housing law -penalizing landlords who harass, making it harder for them to push working class people out & double the rents in gentrifying San Francisco. We also won a subjective battle. We proved to ourselves, to elected officials, and to our communities who are under attack that displacement is not inevitable, that regulations in market housing can curb displacement, and that impacted communities can lead the fight to build a different kind of San Francisco – one that holds community at its heart.

Who are we up against?

Is it tech corporations, real estate developers, local government? Recent protests against the Google Bus highlighted this question, and made national headlines. Some blame tech workers - highly paid, primarily young white people who are pouring into long-time working class communities of color; workers who too often treat our communities like a colorful “ethnic” backdrop for their corporate lives. Some blame the real estate industry - the most active wing of the finance sector that has a stranglehold on California’s economy. The ruthless industry is famous for creating the foreclosure crisis, embodied now by “flippers” that circle like vultures around Mission District Victorians after a working class family has been evicted, setting up sandwich board signs that signal the conversion of a rent-controlled unit into a million-dollar condominium.

This question came up at a meeting I recently attended, where Mission-district community-based organizations met with tech sector representatives, convened by District 9 Supervisor, David Campos. Google, Facebook, AirBnB, and a host of smaller crowd-source start-ups approached Supervisor Campos, wanting to fix the image problem tech has earned for itself in the Mission District. Rather than letting the big companies make a token gesture for PR purposes, to his credit, he brought mission community organizations together so we could express our concerns directly.

It was enlightening, to say the least, to speak directly to representatives of these companies. I noticed that smaller start-ups tended to have a very different character than the big corporations. And yet, somehow, in the public eye, huge tech corporations retain a kind of “perpetual start-up” image – as if its passion, creativity, genius, that drives them, not the billions of dollars they make in profit. A little research revealed that the giant tech corporations are, in fact, known for cartel-like behavior. A huge lawsuit is currently pending, seeking compensation for tens of thousands of engineers whose wages were kept artificially low. CEO’s from Google, Apple, Intel, and Adobe are being sued for violating the Anti-Trust Act, conspiring with each other so that none of them would recruit engineers at each other’s companies with higher wages, thus repressing engineer wages throughout the industry in order to increase profits.[vi] Not to mention wi-fi buses that shuttle workers from SF to Silicon Valley squeeze at least two more hours of work out of each employee. It was ironic, then, to hear company reps defend tech employees from community criticism. If you wanted your employees to be treated more respectfully, shouldn’t you start by doing so, yourself?

What these tech corporation representatives (many in new “community liaison” positions just created a few months ago in response to public pressure) heard from the community was how tech workers flooding into the Mission creates the profit motive for landlords to push people out. Whether the individual tech workers are conscious of it or not, they are complicit in the process of gentrification. The Google bus protests struck a nerve because they highlighted how the Tech sector is facilitating the forced displacement of families like Jessica’s, all while using city infrastructure built with taxes her family has paid, for decades, while tech companies have dodged taxation. The recent ruling by the Metropolitan Transport Agency requiring these huge corporate buses pay $1 per stop was like a slap in the face to the community. Jessica herself pays $2 each time she rides Muni or gets on the bus – each individual bus rider pays DOUBLE what these tax-dodging multi-billion corporations pay. [vii]

Both the Tech and the Real Estate Industries have to take responsibility for the affordability crisis in San Francisco. Blaming Real Estate is an easy out for Tech companies that claim to be “innovating for social good” but ignore the impact their boardrooms of innovation have on surrounding communities. Meanwhile, Real Estate happily lets Tech workers take the blame for their reckless profiteering, hiding behind the myth that the housing market is some kind of force of nature, instead of a real time series of power relationships that human beings have responsibility for. In the background of each wave of gentrification, each massive increase in rents, each conversion of a rent-controlled apartment into a luxury condominium is an incredibly powerful finance industry that shapes not just San Francisco, but California as a whole.

Who will defend the heart of San Francisco?

Local governments need to step up to the challenge of holding corporations accountable. Accepting gifts from Tech Industry tycoons as a way to let them avoid real taxation is neither sustainable as a strategy, nor defensible morally. Letting Real Estate throw in a couple affordable units as a way to avoid real regulation in the housing market is not just insufficient to meet the affordability needs – it’s fueling the displacement of working class communities of color.

In his “State of the City” address, Mayor Ed Lee promised to defend tenant protections, fight the Ellis Act, and build affordable housing. Without a strategy of corporate accountability, these promises will be impossible to keep. What does the city gain by depriving itself of tax revenue? Billions of dollars come through San Francisco this way, pushing working class communities out and filtering into private hands. Promising to provide “Housing for All” without an aggressive corporate accountability strategy is like handing out free umbrellas in the face of a Tsunami.

And it's bigger than just the Mayor. Every one of us has a role to play in the battle for the heart of San Francisco. Concerned individuals, direct action collectives, neighborhood associations, small businesses committed to the community, tech workers exploited by their bosses, we all have a responsibility. Causa Justa :: Just Cause organizes people like Jessica, people directly impacted by the crisis, who instead of being victims are, through community struggle, becoming protagonists in the fight for the heart of San Francisco. We know that supporting grassroots leadership is the only way we will change the balance of power in the long term, and we built an organization to play that role in the movement. And there are many more roles to play – from legal and policy work, to direct action in the streets, to building affordable housing, to cultural and community healing work. If we work together, we are stronger. As we learned in the late 90s in the mission, we must work together at a scale bigger than any one neighborhood if we are to contend with the powerful forces driving gentrification.

Today, we have citywide organizations like San Francisco Rising and the San Francisco Anti-Displacement Coalition, poised to fight the battle for the heart of San Francisco. If local government isn't representing us well, then we can make ourselves heard – at the ballot box, in the streets, at corporate headquarters and bus stops, in church halls and city hall.

Gentrification is not natural. Displacement is not inevitable. Everyday people, when we come together, can change the course of history.

Join Jessica, and hundreds of impacted tenants as we come together to build grassroots power, Sat, Feb 8th, at the citywide San Francisco tenant convention!

Live elsewhere in California? Sign the petition to repeal the Ellis Act.

 

[i] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/14/san-francisco-rents-the-highest-in-nation_n_1345275.html http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/san-francisco-rent_n_2592561.html

[ii] http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3500-19th-St-302-San-Francisco-CA-94110/2108983740_zpid/?utm_source=email&;utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp

[iii] http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/11/07/117540/Priced-Out-Ellis-Act-San-Francisco-eviction

[iv] http://sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=1067

[v]More: http://gawker.com/dear-khary-an-autobiography-of-gentrification-1227561902

[vi] http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-google-anti-trust-2013-10

[vii]More: http://www.salon.com/2014/01/23/when_companies_break_the_law_and_people_pay_the_scary_lesson_of_the_google_bus/

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Gentrification and The Battle for the Heart of San Francisco | Maria Poblet

Tue, 02/04/2014 - 2:55pm

San Francisco’s gentrification has reached a ridiculous new extreme, making it the most expensive city in the country,[i] outstripping even Manhattan, the home of Wall Street and its corporate tycoons.

The affordability crisis is so extreme that many of those who rode into the Mission District on the first wave of gentrification, during the dotcom boom in the 90s, are now crying foul. Even they can’t afford the 2-bedroom apartment on Valencia Street renting for $11,500/month.[ii] They find themselves priced out of their lofts and community networks, by a whole new wave of highly paid tech workers who ride in on the Google bus every evening, driving rents and home prices to dizzying new heights.

If a well-paid tech worker can’t stay in the Mission, what are the prospects for someone like Jessica, a student whose mother works as a janitor? Born living at 24th and Harrison, she came to Causa Justa :: Just Cause to find our what her family could do to keep their home. They battled valiantly, but were ultimately pushed out of their home of 23 years by an investor who forced them to accept a buy out, by threatening to Ellis Act the entire 9-unit building.

The Ellis Act, passed by the real estate lobby in 1986 allows landlords to remove rent-controlled units from the rental market, and turn them into condominiums for sale. It’s a real estate speculator’s dream, and a long-term tenant’s nightmare. Particularly in gentrifying neighborhoods, where real estate prices spike and there’s a profit motive to kick out long-term tenants.[iii]

Jessica’s working class Latino family is deeply committed to staying in San Francisco. The city is more than just their home. It’s home to their extended family of aunties, godfathers, cousins and in-laws. It’s where they have worked in service-sector jobs since the 80s, when so many Central American immigrants arrived to the Sanctuary City[iv], infusing local politics with internationalist ethics. It’s the web of community networks, public schools, and neighorhood-based social services that supports kids as they grow up, and adults as they become elders. It’s that way-beyond-nuclear type of family we call “community.”

Community is that palpable sense of connectedness you feel at the Palestinian-owned corner store on Mission Street. At the Spanish-only Thai grocer on 16th street, where decades-long neighbors run into each, buying freshly fried plantain chips made by a Honduran neighbor, hard-to-find Vietnamese hot sauce, or prickly delicious Rambutan fruit, while catchy Arab pop and Northern Mexican Rancheras blare onto the street. Community is the lunch counter that has served southern Barbeque to SRO residents ever since the days that same building was a tenement, housing African-American migrants who came here from the South to build the naval shipyard in Hunter’s Point.

Their descendants are now scattered as far as Antioch and Sacramento, over-represented in homeless shelters, absent from the streets of the Fillmore, SF’s former center of Black culture, now decorated with painfully ironic “Jazz Legacy” street signs for tourists.[v] Community is the traditional Mexican Tres Leches cake the inter-racial queer couple buys at the Chinese bakery every year, wishing a transgender partner “Happy Birthday” to celebrate their gender transition.

Community is the social fabric made up of each of these inter-twined threads. It’s not something you can put a price on. But there is a price - a huge price.

In order to stay in San Francisco, Jessica’s family now pays 40% more for their housing. Did janitors' wages go up 40% this year? Did the cost of living decrease 40%? Did mom-and-pop stores that serve families like Jessica’s get a 40% decrease in skyrocketing commercial rents, so they could lower prices? Not a chance. Instead, Jessica’s family makes it work the way thousands do, by living in more crowded, less habitable conditions, cutting costs on everything from healthcare, to transportation, to food.

For the thousands of families like Jessica’s, the battle to expand tenant rights is more important than ever. Yes, building affordable housing is important. But, by itself, it is just not enough. Non-profit developers struggle to make ends meet and keep units off the market, and, ironically, they need to raise money from the very same corporate interests that are razing our communities. Inclusionary zoning – a few affordable units within huge market-rate developments – is at best a drop in the bucket, and, most often a window-dressing used to justify huge luxury developments that accelerate the pace of gentrification. While all of these reforms have a place in a larger strategy, tenant rights are crucial today more than ever. The single most aggressive way to increase affordability and defend thousands of working class families in San Francisco is to regulate the rental market.

Last year, Causa Justa :: Just Cause lead an effort to win a “hassle-free” housing law -penalizing landlords who harass, making it harder for them to push working class people out & double the rents in gentrifying San Francisco. We also won a subjective battle. We proved to ourselves, to elected officials, and to our communities who are under attack that displacement is not inevitable, that regulations in market housing can curb displacement, and that impacted communities can lead the fight to build a different kind of San Francisco – one that holds community at its heart.

Who are we up against?

Is it tech corporations, real estate developers, local government? Recent protests against the Google Bus highlighted this question, and made national headlines. Some blame tech workers - highly paid, primarily young white people who are pouring into long-time working class communities of color; workers who too often treat our communities like a colorful “ethnic” backdrop for their corporate lives. Some blame the real estate industry - the most active wing of the finance sector that has a stranglehold on California’s economy. The ruthless industry is famous for creating the foreclosure crisis, embodied now by “flippers” that circle like vultures around Mission District Victorians after a working class family has been evicted, setting up sandwich board signs that signal the conversion of a rent-controlled unit into a million-dollar condominium.

This question came up at a meeting I recently attended, where Mission-district community-based organizations met with tech sector representatives, convened by District 9 Supervisor, David Campos. Google, Facebook, AirBnB, and a host of smaller crowd-source start-ups approached Supervisor Campos, wanting to fix the image problem tech has earned for itself in the Mission District. Rather than letting the big companies make a token gesture for PR purposes, to his credit, he brought mission community organizations together so we could express our concerns directly.

It was enlightening, to say the least, to speak directly to representatives of these companies. I noticed that smaller start-ups tended to have a very different character than the big corporations. And yet, somehow, in the public eye, huge tech corporations retain a kind of “perpetual start-up” image – as if its passion, creativity, genius, that drives them, not the billions of dollars they make in profit. A little research revealed that the giant tech corporations are, in fact, known for cartel-like behavior. A huge lawsuit is currently pending, seeking compensation for tens of thousands of engineers whose wages were kept artificially low. CEO’s from Google, Apple, Intel, and Adobe are being sued for violating the Anti-Trust Act, conspiring with each other so that none of them would recruit engineers at each other’s companies with higher wages, thus repressing engineer wages throughout the industry in order to increase profits.[vi] Not to mention wi-fi buses that shuttle workers from SF to Silicon Valley squeeze at least two more hours of work out of each employee. It was ironic, then, to hear company reps defend tech employees from community criticism. If you wanted your employees to be treated more respectfully, shouldn’t you start by doing so, yourself?

What these tech corporation representatives (many in new “community liaison” positions just created a few months ago in response to public pressure) heard from the community was how tech workers flooding into the Mission creates the profit motive for landlords to push people out. Whether the individual tech workers are conscious of it or not, they are complicit in the process of gentrification. The Google bus protests struck a nerve because they highlighted how the Tech sector is facilitating the forced displacement of families like Jessica’s, all while using city infrastructure built with taxes her family has paid, for decades, while tech companies have dodged taxation. The recent ruling by the Metropolitan Transport Agency requiring these huge corporate buses pay $1 per stop was like a slap in the face to the community. Jessica herself pays $2 each time she rides Muni or gets on the bus – each individual bus rider pays DOUBLE what these tax-dodging multi-billion corporations pay. [vii]

Both the Tech and the Real Estate Industries have to take responsibility for the affordability crisis in San Francisco. Blaming Real Estate is an easy out for Tech companies that claim to be “innovating for social good” but ignore the impact their boardrooms of innovation have on surrounding communities. Meanwhile, Real Estate happily lets Tech workers take the blame for their reckless profiteering, hiding behind the myth that the housing market is some kind of force of nature, instead of a real time series of power relationships that human beings have responsibility for. In the background of each wave of gentrification, each massive increase in rents, each conversion of a rent-controlled apartment into a luxury condominium is an incredibly powerful finance industry that shapes not just San Francisco, but California as a whole.

Who will defend the heart of San Francisco?

Local governments need to step up to the challenge of holding corporations accountable. Accepting gifts from Tech Industry tycoons as a way to let them avoid real taxation is neither sustainable as a strategy, nor defensible morally. Letting Real Estate throw in a couple affordable units as a way to avoid real regulation in the housing market is not just insufficient to meet the affordability needs – it’s fueling the displacement of working class communities of color.

In his “State of the City” address, Mayor Ed Lee promised to defend tenant protections, fight the Ellis Act, and build affordable housing. Without a strategy of corporate accountability, these promises will be impossible to keep. What does the city gain by depriving itself of tax revenue? Billions of dollars come through San Francisco this way, pushing working class communities out and filtering into private hands. Promising to provide “Housing for All” without an aggressive corporate accountability strategy is like handing out free umbrellas in the face of a Tsunami.

And it's bigger than just the Mayor. Every one of us has a role to play in the battle for the heart of San Francisco. Concerned individuals, direct action collectives, neighborhood associations, small businesses committed to the community, tech workers exploited by their bosses, we all have a responsibility. Causa Justa :: Just Cause organizes people like Jessica, people directly impacted by the crisis, who instead of being victims are, through community struggle, becoming protagonists in the fight for the heart of San Francisco. We know that supporting grassroots leadership is the only way we will change the balance of power in the long term, and we built an organization to play that role in the movement. And there are many more roles to play – from legal and policy work, to direct action in the streets, to building affordable housing, to cultural and community healing work. If we work together, we are stronger. As we learned in the late 90s in the mission, we must work together at a scale bigger than any one neighborhood if we are to contend with the powerful forces driving gentrification.

Today, we have citywide organizations like San Francisco Rising and the San Francisco Anti-Displacement Coalition, poised to fight the battle for the heart of San Francisco. If local government isn't representing us well, then we can make ourselves heard – at the ballot box, in the streets, at corporate headquarters and bus stops, in church halls and city hall.

Gentrification is not natural. Displacement is not inevitable. Everyday people, when we come together, can change the course of history.

Join Jessica, and hundreds of impacted tenants as we come together to build grassroots power, Sat, Feb 8th, at the citywide San Francisco tenant convention!

Live elsewhere in California? Sign the petition to repeal the Ellis Act.

 

[i] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/14/san-francisco-rents-the-highest-in-nation_n_1345275.html http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/san-francisco-rent_n_2592561.html

[ii] http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3500-19th-St-302-San-Francisco-CA-94110/2108983740_zpid/?utm_source=email&;utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=emo-sendtofriend-hdp

[iii] http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2013/11/07/117540/Priced-Out-Ellis-Act-San-Francisco-eviction

[iv] http://sfgsa.org/index.aspx?page=1067

[v]More: http://gawker.com/dear-khary-an-autobiography-of-gentrification-1227561902

[vi] http://www.businessinsider.com/apple-google-anti-trust-2013-10

[vii]More: http://www.salon.com/2014/01/23/when_companies_break_the_law_and_people_pay_the_scary_lesson_of_the_google_bus/

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

May Day Rally & March for Just Reform

Tue, 04/30/2013 - 3:36pm

 

Video by Francisco Barradas
 

 

 

This May Day join us as we march for a Just Reform, an end to the Deportations and Justice for our communities!
May Day March, Wednesday, May 1. March with CJJC
Date:   Wednesday, May 1
Time:   2:30PM

We will all be meeting at our CJJC offices on 2300 Mission Street #201.
We will meet at CJJC and march to join our friends at 24th Street & Mission together!

KEEP FAMILIES TOGETHER
Alameda County is one step closer to Keeping Families together and restoring due process

We want to also thank the more than 200 people who took time off from their busy lives to join CJJC and ACUDIR last Tuesday at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors chamber to witness the historic vote calling for an end to holding immigrants for ICE in Alameda County. The passage of this non-binding resolution sends a clear message to the Alameda County Sheriff to change his practice and stop holding people for ICE. This is a big first step and we will continue to call on you to show up to hearings and at community meetings.
We’re have a town hall soon with Sheriff Ahern in Cherryland, with the place to be determined to continue raising our voices until we have put an end to the collaboration between ICE and Police. Will you join us?! To stay informed please rsvp to the event here____ to stay updated on the campaign follow us at on facebook, on our website, www.cjjc.org and ACUDIR website at www.acudirca.org


Categories: Grassroots Newswire

May Day Rally & March for Just Reform

Tue, 04/30/2013 - 3:36pm

 

Video by Francisco Barradas
 

 

 

This May Day join us as we march for a Just Reform, an end to the Deportations and Justice for our communities!
May Day March, Wednesday, May 1. March with CJJC
Date:   Wednesday, May 1
Time:   2:30PM

We will all be meeting at our CJJC offices on 2300 Mission Street #201.
We will meet at CJJC and march to join our friends at 24th Street & Mission together!

KEEP FAMILIES TOGETHER
Alameda County is one step closer to Keeping Families together and restoring due process

We want to also thank the more than 200 people who took time off from their busy lives to join CJJC and ACUDIR last Tuesday at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors chamber to witness the historic vote calling for an end to holding immigrants for ICE in Alameda County. The passage of this non-binding resolution sends a clear message to the Alameda County Sheriff to change his practice and stop holding people for ICE. This is a big first step and we will continue to call on you to show up to hearings and at community meetings.
We’re have a town hall soon with Sheriff Ahern in Cherryland, with the place to be determined to continue raising our voices until we have put an end to the collaboration between ICE and Police. Will you join us?! To stay informed please rsvp to the event here____ to stay updated on the campaign follow us at on facebook, on our website, www.cjjc.org and ACUDIR website at www.acudirca.org


Categories: Grassroots Newswire

May Day Rally & March for Just Reform

Tue, 04/30/2013 - 3:36pm

 

Video by Francisco Barradas
 

 

 

This May Day join us as we march for a Just Reform, an end to the Deportations and Justice for our communities!
May Day March, Wednesday, May 1. March with CJJC
Date:   Wednesday, May 1
Time:   2:30PM

We will all be meeting at our CJJC offices on 2300 Mission Street #201.
We will meet at CJJC and march to join our friends at 24th Street & Mission together!

KEEP FAMILIES TOGETHER
Alameda County is one step closer to Keeping Families together and restoring due process

We want to also thank the more than 200 people who took time off from their busy lives to join CJJC and ACUDIR last Tuesday at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors chamber to witness the historic vote calling for an end to holding immigrants for ICE in Alameda County. The passage of this non-binding resolution sends a clear message to the Alameda County Sheriff to change his practice and stop holding people for ICE. This is a big first step and we will continue to call on you to show up to hearings and at community meetings.
We’re have a town hall soon with Sheriff Ahern in Cherryland, with the place to be determined to continue raising our voices until we have put an end to the collaboration between ICE and Police. Will you join us?! To stay informed please rsvp to the event here____ to stay updated on the campaign follow us at on facebook, on our website, www.cjjc.org and ACUDIR website at www.acudirca.org


Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Alameda Co. Supes Urge Sheriff to Halt Painful Deportations

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 2:34am

Following a spirited rally this morning led by community and faith groups and passionate testimony from scores of community members, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution calling on Sheriff Greg Ahern to stop the constitutionally dubious practice of holding people for extra time, beyond the point they would otherwise be released, just so they can be picked up for deportation. The Board approved today's resolution by a vote of 3-1.

With immigration reform on the horizon, the continued deportation of community members who could soon be on the road to citizenship is generating increasing controversy across the nation. A broad coalition of Alameda County community, labor and faith groups, organized by the ACUDIR coalition,  is calling on the County to take national leadership by enacting a policy that ends cruel and costly ICE "holds" in the county.

If implemented by the Sheriff, "This policy will uphold key values of equality and fairness, keep families together, and strengthen relationships between communities and law enforcement," said Ariana Gil Nafarrate of Mujeres Unidas y Activas.

Said Cinthya Muñoz, of Causa Justa :: Just Cause: "Today is an important one. Many people took time off work, school, and even bringing their families here to share how important this is and to encourage the passage of this resolution. It is one small step in the right direction to ensure that communities will be treated fairly."

The resolution comes in response to extended detentions of community members in local jails, which have led to more than 2,000 deportations in the county since 2010.

The deportations have shattered families and eroded trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement. Immigration officials often take people before they have even had their day in court, and even victims and witnesses to crimes have been swept up in deportation proceedings.

At the heart of the problem are Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) "holds" or "detainer" requests, frequently triggered by the controversial "Secure Communities" deportation program. Through the requests, ICE asks officials like Sheriff Ahern to hold people for extra time, at taxpayer expense, when they would otherwise be released. Throughout California, holds have led to needless prolonged detention of immigrant domestic violence victims, street vendors arrested only for selling food without a permit, and even U.S. citizens. 

As California's Attorney General confirmed late last year, these controversial requests are entirely optional. In fact, Santa Clara County, and Cook County in Illinois, have already stopped responding to the constitutionally questionable requests.

"Alameda County should take immediate leadership by enacting the strongest policy possible, since every ICE hold is a lawsuit and a constitutional crisis waiting to happen," said Muñoz of Causa Justa::Just Cause.

Efforts are also underway to limit ICE holds with statewide legislation - as California's TRUST Act advances, it has been copied in several states.  Advocates believe that leadership in Alameda county could advance statewide and even national efforts to curb deportations. 

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Alameda Co. Supes Urge Sheriff to Halt Painful Deportations

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 2:34am

Following a spirited rally this morning led by community and faith groups and passionate testimony from scores of community members, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution calling on Sheriff Greg Ahern to stop the constitutionally dubious practice of holding people for extra time, beyond the point they would otherwise be released, just so they can be picked up for deportation. The Board approved today's resolution by a vote of 3-1.

With immigration reform on the horizon, the continued deportation of community members who could soon be on the road to citizenship is generating increasing controversy across the nation. A broad coalition of Alameda County community, labor and faith groups, organized by the ACUDIR coalition,  is calling on the County to take national leadership by enacting a policy that ends cruel and costly ICE "holds" in the county.

If implemented by the Sheriff, "This policy will uphold key values of equality and fairness, keep families together, and strengthen relationships between communities and law enforcement," said Ariana Gil Nafarrate of Mujeres Unidas y Activas.

Said Cinthya Muñoz, of Causa Justa :: Just Cause: "Today is an important one. Many people took time off work, school, and even bringing their families here to share how important this is and to encourage the passage of this resolution. It is one small step in the right direction to ensure that communities will be treated fairly."

The resolution comes in response to extended detentions of community members in local jails, which have led to more than 2,000 deportations in the county since 2010.

The deportations have shattered families and eroded trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement. Immigration officials often take people before they have even had their day in court, and even victims and witnesses to crimes have been swept up in deportation proceedings.

At the heart of the problem are Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) "holds" or "detainer" requests, frequently triggered by the controversial "Secure Communities" deportation program. Through the requests, ICE asks officials like Sheriff Ahern to hold people for extra time, at taxpayer expense, when they would otherwise be released. Throughout California, holds have led to needless prolonged detention of immigrant domestic violence victims, street vendors arrested only for selling food without a permit, and even U.S. citizens. 

As California's Attorney General confirmed late last year, these controversial requests are entirely optional. In fact, Santa Clara County, and Cook County in Illinois, have already stopped responding to the constitutionally questionable requests.

"Alameda County should take immediate leadership by enacting the strongest policy possible, since every ICE hold is a lawsuit and a constitutional crisis waiting to happen," said Muñoz of Causa Justa::Just Cause.

Efforts are also underway to limit ICE holds with statewide legislation - as California's TRUST Act advances, it has been copied in several states.  Advocates believe that leadership in Alameda county could advance statewide and even national efforts to curb deportations. 

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

Alameda Co. Supes Urge Sheriff to Halt Painful Deportations

Wed, 04/24/2013 - 2:34am

Following a spirited rally this morning led by community and faith groups and passionate testimony from scores of community members, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors approved a resolution calling on Sheriff Greg Ahern to stop the constitutionally dubious practice of holding people for extra time, beyond the point they would otherwise be released, just so they can be picked up for deportation. The Board approved today's resolution by a vote of 3-1.

With immigration reform on the horizon, the continued deportation of community members who could soon be on the road to citizenship is generating increasing controversy across the nation. A broad coalition of Alameda County community, labor and faith groups, organized by the ACUDIR coalition,  is calling on the County to take national leadership by enacting a policy that ends cruel and costly ICE "holds" in the county.

If implemented by the Sheriff, "This policy will uphold key values of equality and fairness, keep families together, and strengthen relationships between communities and law enforcement," said Ariana Gil Nafarrate of Mujeres Unidas y Activas.

Said Cinthya Muñoz, of Causa Justa :: Just Cause: "Today is an important one. Many people took time off work, school, and even bringing their families here to share how important this is and to encourage the passage of this resolution. It is one small step in the right direction to ensure that communities will be treated fairly."

The resolution comes in response to extended detentions of community members in local jails, which have led to more than 2,000 deportations in the county since 2010.

The deportations have shattered families and eroded trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement. Immigration officials often take people before they have even had their day in court, and even victims and witnesses to crimes have been swept up in deportation proceedings.

At the heart of the problem are Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) "holds" or "detainer" requests, frequently triggered by the controversial "Secure Communities" deportation program. Through the requests, ICE asks officials like Sheriff Ahern to hold people for extra time, at taxpayer expense, when they would otherwise be released. Throughout California, holds have led to needless prolonged detention of immigrant domestic violence victims, street vendors arrested only for selling food without a permit, and even U.S. citizens. 

As California's Attorney General confirmed late last year, these controversial requests are entirely optional. In fact, Santa Clara County, and Cook County in Illinois, have already stopped responding to the constitutionally questionable requests.

"Alameda County should take immediate leadership by enacting the strongest policy possible, since every ICE hold is a lawsuit and a constitutional crisis waiting to happen," said Muñoz of Causa Justa::Just Cause.

Efforts are also underway to limit ICE holds with statewide legislation - as California's TRUST Act advances, it has been copied in several states.  Advocates believe that leadership in Alameda county could advance statewide and even national efforts to curb deportations. 

 

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

End S-Comm: Countywide Call-in Day April 22 to Alameda County Supervisors

Fri, 04/19/2013 - 3:17pm

 (poster Jesús Barraza)

                                          Join ACUDIR on Monday, April 22nd for a COUNTYWIDE CALL-IN DAY to put an end to S-Comm (“Secure Communities”) in Alameda County.    Call each of the following Board Members:   Keith Carson – District 5    (510) 272-6695   Nate Miley – District 4       (510) 272-6694 Scott Haggerty – District 1  (510) 272-6691 Wilma Chan – District 3     (510) 272-6693   Sample Script:

“My name is ______, I’m calling you today to urge you to do everything in your power to end "Secure Communities" or S-Comm in the County. S-Comm is separating families, denying immigrants due process and leaving our communities vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. S-Comm deepens mistrust of law enforcement and drains county resources. We urge your vote in support of the resolution to end S-Comm at this Tuesday’s hearing and ask that you continue to work with our communities to end this cruel and costly program in Alameda County. Thank you.”

 

 

 

En Español:

 

Acompañe a ACUDIR Lunes 22 de Abril llamando a los supervisores del condado pidiendo un fin al programa de S-Comm (“Comunidades Seguras”) en el condado de Alameda.

Mi nombre es _______ , le llamo hoy día para pedirle que haga todo en su poder para poner un fin al programa de "Comunidades Seguras", o S-Comm en el condado. S-Comm separa familias, niega el proceso debido y justo a los inmigrantes y deja a nuestras comunidades vulnerables al abuso y la explotación. S-Comm profundiza la falta de confianza hacia la policía y gasta recursos del condado innecesariamente. Le pedimos que vote a favor de la resolución para poner un fin a S-Comm en la audiencia este martes y que continue trabajando con nuestras comunidades para terminar con este programa cruel y costoso en el condado de Alameda. Gracias"   2. Join us for the Board Supervisors hearing in support of the Resolution!   Join us Tuesday April 23rd at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors in Support of a resolution to Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-Comm in the County!    Tuesday April 23rd  Board Supervisors Hearing 1221 oak st. Oakland (5th floor)   We will gather to share food at 10:00am, will have a press conference/rally at 11am and at 12 Noon we will head inside to the 5th floor to give testimony in support of a resolution that the Board of Supervisors will be voting on calling for an end to S-Comm in the County. Join us, together we can "Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-comm in the County"!   For more information contact Cinthya@cjjc.org or call 510.318.7398 please rsvp here: Facebook invitation
3. Sign the petition!   Please take some time to sign our petition:    Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to Scomm in the County!  http://org.credoaction.com/petitions/alameda-county-get-out-of-the-immigrant-detention-deportation-business

 

 
Categories: Grassroots Newswire

End S-Comm: Countywide Call-in Day April 22 to Alameda County Supervisors

Fri, 04/19/2013 - 3:17pm

 (poster Jesús Barraza)

                                          Join ACUDIR on Monday, April 22nd for a COUNTYWIDE CALL-IN DAY to put an end to S-Comm (“Secure Communities”) in Alameda County.    Call each of the following Board Members:   Keith Carson – District 5    (510) 272-6695   Nate Miley – District 4       (510) 272-6694 Scott Haggerty – District 1  (510) 272-6691 Wilma Chan – District 3     (510) 272-6693   Sample Script:

“My name is ______, I’m calling you today to urge you to do everything in your power to end "Secure Communities" or S-Comm in the County. S-Comm is separating families, denying immigrants due process and leaving our communities vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. S-Comm deepens mistrust of law enforcement and drains county resources. We urge your vote in support of the resolution to end S-Comm at this Tuesday’s hearing and ask that you continue to work with our communities to end this cruel and costly program in Alameda County. Thank you.”

 

 

 

En Español:

 

Acompañe a ACUDIR Lunes 22 de Abril llamando a los supervisores del condado pidiendo un fin al programa de S-Comm (“Comunidades Seguras”) en el condado de Alameda.

Mi nombre es _______ , le llamo hoy día para pedirle que haga todo en su poder para poner un fin al programa de "Comunidades Seguras", o S-Comm en el condado. S-Comm separa familias, niega el proceso debido y justo a los inmigrantes y deja a nuestras comunidades vulnerables al abuso y la explotación. S-Comm profundiza la falta de confianza hacia la policía y gasta recursos del condado innecesariamente. Le pedimos que vote a favor de la resolución para poner un fin a S-Comm en la audiencia este martes y que continue trabajando con nuestras comunidades para terminar con este programa cruel y costoso en el condado de Alameda. Gracias"   2. Join us for the Board Supervisors hearing in support of the Resolution!   Join us Tuesday April 23rd at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors in Support of a resolution to Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-Comm in the County!    Tuesday April 23rd  Board Supervisors Hearing 1221 oak st. Oakland (5th floor)   We will gather to share food at 10:00am, will have a press conference/rally at 11am and at 12 Noon we will head inside to the 5th floor to give testimony in support of a resolution that the Board of Supervisors will be voting on calling for an end to S-Comm in the County. Join us, together we can "Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-comm in the County"!   For more information contact Cinthya@cjjc.org or call 510.318.7398 please rsvp here: Facebook invitation
3. Sign the petition!   Please take some time to sign our petition:    Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to Scomm in the County!  http://org.credoaction.com/petitions/alameda-county-get-out-of-the-immigrant-detention-deportation-business

 

 
Categories: Grassroots Newswire

End S-Comm: Countywide Call-in Day April 22 to Alameda County Supervisors

Fri, 04/19/2013 - 3:17pm

 (poster Jesús Barraza)

                                          Join ACUDIR on Monday, April 22nd for a COUNTYWIDE CALL-IN DAY to put an end to S-Comm (“Secure Communities”) in Alameda County.    Call each of the following Board Members:   Keith Carson – District 5    (510) 272-6695   Nate Miley – District 4       (510) 272-6694 Scott Haggerty – District 1  (510) 272-6691 Wilma Chan – District 3     (510) 272-6693   Sample Script:

“My name is ______, I’m calling you today to urge you to do everything in your power to end "Secure Communities" or S-Comm in the County. S-Comm is separating families, denying immigrants due process and leaving our communities vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. S-Comm deepens mistrust of law enforcement and drains county resources. We urge your vote in support of the resolution to end S-Comm at this Tuesday’s hearing and ask that you continue to work with our communities to end this cruel and costly program in Alameda County. Thank you.”

 

 

 

En Español:

 

Acompañe a ACUDIR Lunes 22 de Abril llamando a los supervisores del condado pidiendo un fin al programa de S-Comm (“Comunidades Seguras”) en el condado de Alameda.

Mi nombre es _______ , le llamo hoy día para pedirle que haga todo en su poder para poner un fin al programa de "Comunidades Seguras", o S-Comm en el condado. S-Comm separa familias, niega el proceso debido y justo a los inmigrantes y deja a nuestras comunidades vulnerables al abuso y la explotación. S-Comm profundiza la falta de confianza hacia la policía y gasta recursos del condado innecesariamente. Le pedimos que vote a favor de la resolución para poner un fin a S-Comm en la audiencia este martes y que continue trabajando con nuestras comunidades para terminar con este programa cruel y costoso en el condado de Alameda. Gracias"   2. Join us for the Board Supervisors hearing in support of the Resolution!   Join us Tuesday April 23rd at the Alameda County Board of Supervisors in Support of a resolution to Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-Comm in the County!    Tuesday April 23rd  Board Supervisors Hearing 1221 oak st. Oakland (5th floor)   We will gather to share food at 10:00am, will have a press conference/rally at 11am and at 12 Noon we will head inside to the 5th floor to give testimony in support of a resolution that the Board of Supervisors will be voting on calling for an end to S-Comm in the County. Join us, together we can "Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to S-comm in the County"!   For more information contact Cinthya@cjjc.org or call 510.318.7398 please rsvp here: Facebook invitation
3. Sign the petition!   Please take some time to sign our petition:    Keep Families Together, Restore Due Process and Put an End to Scomm in the County!  http://org.credoaction.com/petitions/alameda-county-get-out-of-the-immigrant-detention-deportation-business

 

 
Categories: Grassroots Newswire

April 10: National Day Action for Immigration Reform

Wed, 04/10/2013 - 3:03pm
Major march in SF Urging Leaders to champion inclusive immigration reform

 When and where: Wednesday, April 10

·      3:00 PM:  Program begins at 1 Post St.
·      3:30 PM:  March leaves 1 Post St. Route includes stops symbolizing need for reform to protect worker rights (4 Seasons Hotel), family unity (at 6th and Market), and to end painful deportations (fed. building).
·      5:00 PM:  Rally at old Federal Building, 450 Golden Gate Ave.

Participants will carry hundreds of hand-made paper flowers, which symbolize the approximately 1,000 people deported from the US every day, and create an altar with the flowers in front of the federal building.

What: On a massive national day of action for immigration reform - with events from Washington, DC to Los Angeles - hundreds will march from the San Francisco Office of Senator Dianne Feinstein to the old Federal Building.
Who: Religious leaders will kick off the program with an interfaith prayer; workers, students, and community members will also address the crowd - including people currently facing unjust deportation. The Brass Liberation Orchestra will accompany the march.

Students, workers, and community leaders are calling for inclusive reform that upholds the principle that “all are created equal” by creating an immigration process that keeps all families together, protects workers rights, ends painful deportations, and ensures civil and human rights protections.

The action comes on the heels of the TRUST Act (AB-4-Ammiano) being approved by  the Public Safety Committee in Sacramento yesterday, and the Asian Law Caucus, one of the bill's sponsors,  filing a Freedom of Information lawsuit against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for information as to whether ICE maneuvers last year helped defeat the TRUST Act veto Sept 12, by Gov. Brown. The bill would have limited entanglement between California law enforcement and immigration agencies. 

To date, 93,500 Californians have been deported under the discredited "Secure Communities" program - most with minor convictions or none at all.

One community member Teodora Aparicio, who shared her story at yesterday's Alameda County budget hearing to end ICE's hold on our communities, will speak at the rally today. Here is her story.

Today's action is organized by a broad coalition of groups including Asian Law Caucus, ASPIRE, ACLU, Chinese for Affirmative Action, Causa Justa:Just Cause, Educators for Fair Consideration, Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights, Mujeres Unidas y Activas, Out for Immigration, SEIU Local 87, SEIU USWW, SEIU 1021, SF Labor Council, SFOP, Young Workers United, California Immigrant Policy Center, and many others.

Background: With unprecedented momentum and urgency for immigrant rights, Bay Area groups will join a national day of action April 10.  California, with the nation’s largest immigration population, has suffered the most from unjust detentions, deportations, and firings of aspiring citizens.

So students, workers, and community groups are calling on the state’s representatives in Washington, DC to champion policies that promote inclusion and participation over exclusion and division.

Categories: Grassroots Newswire

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